Amazing Phrasing: How to Write Lyrics and Melodies that Fit Together Like a Glove

Hello Fanciers!

Let’s talk about something magical.

Ever notice how some songs seem to have this completely fluid quality about their lyrics? They sound almost like a beautiful cascade of words and lines that melt seamlessly into one another. The rhymes happen right where you expect them to. The point of the song is not only apparent, but made even more so by the structure of each word’s place in the song.

This magical quality is called phrasing.

When a song has great phrasing, you almost hardly notice. Everything is in it’s place and it just feels good. But the second the phrasing get’s weird, we immediately know it. That’s why a good understanding of phrasing makes a huge difference in your songs.

All magic and stardust aside, here’s what phrasing actually is:

Phrasing is the arrangement of words and lyrics into lines and thoughts. It does not distract from the song – it communicates and enhances the flow.

Music also has phrasing. The way a melody can be divided up into individual lines that have a push and pull, a tension and release – that’s musical phrasing. When it’s good, your ear is pushed and pulled in all the right places.

Let’s take a look at some lyrics, shall we?

Phrasing that makes seamless, beautiful sense:

Here’s one of my favorite examples of brilliant phrasing in a song. It’s Gary Burr’s “Can’t Really Be Gone,” cut by Tim McGraw. Let’s look at the first verse:

Her hat is hanging by the door
The one she bought in Mexico
It blocked the wind, it stopped the rain
She’d never leave that one
So she can’t be really gone

When you read this lines to yourself, you immediately know where one thought ends and the next begins. They read like sentences in a book. In fact, let’s put punctuation in:

Her hat is hanging by the door,
The one she bought in Mexico.
It blocked the wind, it stopped the rain.
She’d never leave that one,
So she can’t be really gone.

Every line ends on a comma or a period. Beginning of thought, end of thought. Right where you expect them to be.

Now, let’s look at the other half of this example – the melody. If you need the song for reference, check out the first verse here:

Let’s zoom in on that very first line: “Her hat is hanging by the door.”

Notice that the melody starts down, and leaps up on the word “hat.” This particular word is a noun – you’re probably thinking, “Alright, thanks for the grammar lesson. That is so obvious and uninteresting.” You’re right.

Except this is a very purposeful decision. When you read the word “hat,” you pull up some visual recollection of a hat in your mind. You don’t read it, you see it. Some people might see a combination of letters as well as pictures, but we all see a hat.

Accenting that word with a lift in the melody line gives it emphasis. Bam. A visual is there in your mind. You’re not just listening, you’re seeing the story unfold.

Let’s look at the words, “by the door.”

This is a more subtle employ of phrasing and one of the reasons why Gary Burr is a bawss: the melody sings the same way it speaks.

Go ahead, speak the words “by the door.” You’ll hear your spoken melody – baithuh DOOR. “By” and “the” door link together on the note, and “door” dips down. “Door” also gets the emphasis. It’s weight is carried down as the final, conclusive word in the phrase.

In the song, this line’s melody mimics the natural way someone would speak it. “By” is up, “the door” pulls back down. Your ear can tell that the line has concluded. You know that’s one thought. You know another is coming up next.

Writing better lyrics: Learn how to write songs with amazing phrasing. It's that magical quality that makes everything fit. Click through to get the best advice on phrasing I've ever gotten! | Songfancy.com

You know it’s happening without really knowing it’s happening.

And at the end of the day, the listener hardly notices that all this is happening. It’s a collection of subtle cues, a mastery of language and intonation, that speaks to a very primitive and very empathetic part in all of us. We know it’s happening without knowing it’s happening – the song just makes sense.

That is #amazingphrasing.

Phrasing is a critical tool when it comes to getting your point across in your songs.

If the phasing is off, your listener will know.  It will distract them from your message. If you use jarring phrasing throughout your entire song, you will fatigue the listeners ear and make them more inclined to turn off your song. Or worse, they may decide that your set is a great time for a bathroom break, or to head to the bar for another drink.

That’s not to say that good phrasing isn’t interesting phrasing. Sometimes you have to learn the rules, then break them. Not all your lyrics and melodies have to be picture-perfect nursery rhymes or limericks where every word fits into it’s neighbor like a perfect puzzle piece. You can take risks – stretch words, reverse emphasis, twist your melody around – but be aware of how much warping you’re doing. You don’t want your whole song to be an oddly pronounced string of experimental sounds and syllables.

Writing better lyrics: Learn how to write songs with amazing phrasing. It's that magical quality that makes everything fit. Click through to get the best advice on phrasing I've ever gotten! | Songfancy.com

Want a tip? This is my favorite tool for writing lyrics with great phrasing

I wish I could remember who taught me this because I  literally use it every time I write! This is a great trick for keeping your lyrics and melodies in perfect harmony:

If you write lyrics before melodies:

As you’re writing your words and building their melodies, simply speak your lyrics out loud.

How do they sound when you say them? What is their natural intonation, their internal melody? What words bounce up, what words dip down? What halves of words have the emphasis?

Collect all this info and wrap your melodies around your lyrics in ways that mimic the way they’re naturally spoken.

If you write melodies before lyrics:

Listen closely to your melody. Plink it out on the piano. Be aware of the falls and rises.

Listen to your song. What does it seem to be saying?

A bit esoteric, I know, but within every melody is a hidden string of words waiting to be discovered. What words sound like they naturally fit the rhythm of your melodic lines?

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